Visual Field (Peripheral Vision)

Changes in peripheral vision can occur due to dysfunction anywhere along the visual pathway including the eye, optic nerve and brain.  The kind of defect and whether it is in one or both eyes helps to determine which part(s) of the visual pathway are impaired.  Medical evaluation and peripheral vision tests are important to determine the cause and assess functional ability.

Symptoms can include

The section of the visual field that is missing varies. Examples are:

  • Loss of horizontal or vertical images
  • Loss of side vision
  • Black spot
  • Blurred side vision but clear center vision
  • Tunnel vision

Treatment

Regular testing of visual fields is important for individuals with tumors that affect the visual pathway and for individuals with vision loss due to stroke.  This is often performed in conjunction with other testing to monitor the status of these conditions.


Double Vision

Also called diplopia, seeing two images occurs when the eyes point in different directions.  The pattern of eye movements and measurements of eye alignment help to determine if this is caused by a brain, nerve or muscle problem such as myasthenia gravis, thyroid eye disease, third nerve palsy, fourth nerve palsy, sixth nerve palsy or childhood strabismus, among others.

Symptoms can include

  • Double vision
  • Blurred vision
  • Appearance of “crossed eyes”

Treatment

Medical evaluation is important to determine the cause and manage the symptoms.